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METAL SPINNING PROJECTS

DESCRIPTION: THIS REPRINTED BOOK DESCRIBES SETTING UP, NECESSARY CHUCKS, CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT METALS, AND HOW TO SPIN

Metal Spinning

ISBN: 1877767557

AUTHOR: REAGAN & SMITH
PRICE: $10.00




EXCERPT:
SPINNING TOOLS
The spinner's trade is one of the few trades in which the hand tools used in his craft are not standardized as to size and dimensions. Every spinner makes his own tools to correspond to the individual requirements of the work he is doing and also varies them to suit his own personal ideas in their manufacture. However, the spinner's hand tools can be separated into three general classes: blunt tools, beading tools, and tools with cutting edges. The blunt tools are the most numerous in shapes and kinds. A beading-wheel holder with a number of different size wheels make up the second group. One or two tools with cutting edges fill the requirements for most work.
    Every spinner in industry has a large collection of hand tools which vary greatly as to shape and size. Few spinning jobs may be completed by using any one tool. However, there are several tools of standard shape which have been developed by the old-time craftsmen. Many tools are made, however,which vary greatly from the standard shapes for use in different classes of metal spinning and for different types of metal.
    The tools of standard shape which are the only ones necessary for a person outfitting a shop are the round nose, diamond point, tongue, beading, and planisher. These are shown in Figure 5.
    All of these tools except the diamond-point tool are used with the end of the tool placed beneath the center of the work. One who is taking up metal spinning for the first time should practice laying the spinning tool on the metal disk and manipulating it below the center of the work. He should be careful not to force or push the tool straight into a spinning disk until he is thoroughly proficient in his work. This will avoid injury to the beginner.
    All spinning tools with the exception noted before are used by forcing the end of the tool against the spinning disk. As a result friction ensues. To reduce this friction as much as possible, the end of the tool should be finished to a glasslike smoothness and hardened at the extreme end, leaving the rest of the shaft tough so that it is not so liable to break or snap off while in use.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

1. INTRODUCTION
2. PREFACE
3. HISTORICAL FACTS ABOUT METAL SPINNING
4. INTEREST APPEAL OF METAL SPINNNIG
5. THE MECHANICAL SET-UP FOR METAL SPINNING
6. SPINNNIG TOOLS
7. CHUCKS FOR METAL SPINNING
8. THE TREATMENT OF THE DIFFERENT METALS
9. LUBRICANTS USED IN METAL SPINNING
10. TECHNIQUE OF METAL SPINNING
11. PROJECTS
12. APPENDIX FOR TEACHERS
13. INDEX